The Episcopal Church of the Holy Innocents 

Winter 2018



410 South Atlantic Ave

(Marine Street 

between Atlantic and Beach) 

Beach Haven, New Jersey 08008

609-492-7571
hichurch08008@gmail.com


SERVICES

Next Steps in your Discernment/Search Process


The Good News is that the Discernment Committee has completed the Parish Portfolio. It was reviewed and unanimously approved by the Vestry at its December meeting and then sent on to the Diocese of New Jersey for review by Bishop Stokes and his staff. It will then be sent to the Office of Transition at the National Episcopal Church and Holy Innocents’ Church in Beach Haven will be listed as open and receiving names and materials from interested clergy throughout the Episcopal Church. I expect this to happen sometime soon after the New Year. The diocese typically lists positions open for one month, longer if necessary. All candidates’ names and materials are sent to the bishop’s office for a preliminary vetting and then passed on to the Search Committee.


In the Episcopal Church, while the Search Committee does the work of reviewing materials, visiting and interviewing potential candidates, it is the Vestry that formally calls a new settled Rector. Therefore, a charge to the Search Committee was also approved by the Vestry in December. The charge states how many candidates, etc. the Search Committee will present to the Vestry.


The interview process, when done well, may take several months and the Vestry also charged the Search Committee to take the time needed to find the best candidates to be your new settled Rector. My best guess is that, God willing and the creek don’t rise, you probably will learn who your new settled Rector will be by the summer season of 2019.


From this point on, the Search Process is strictly confidential. Only the members of the Search Committee will know who the candidates are, no one else, not even their spouses or Vestry members or myself or the general church membership. This is important to protect the candidates who may be local clergy and known by some of us. Our job is to trust the process and continue to steep it in prayer.


One final word. When Discernment Committees begin the search and interview process, I also begin to look for my next Interim Ministry position. Sometimes I get a new position and move on before your new settled Rector is in place. Sometimes I do not get a new position until after I leave. I will probably be with you through Easter Sunday on April 21, 2019. It is too early to say how long I will be with you after that.


If you have any questions about the Search Discernment/Process, please feel free to ask Bill Kehr, committee chairman or one of the Wardens or myself.


Christ’s Peace,

Fr. Dan +, Cell: 610-223-5588 


Guidance Prayer for New Ministry “Almighty God, giver of every good gift: Look graciously on your Church, and so guide the minds of the members of the Vestry and Search Committee who shall choose a new settled Rector for Holy Innocents’ Episcopal Church, that we may receive a faithful pastor, who will care for your people and equip us for your ministries; through Jesus our Lord and Saviour.” Amen. (BCP, p. 818)  ​


​​​9:30 AM | Sunday Holy Eucharist 

​10:45  Sunday Morning Adult Forum

9:00 AM  Friday & Monday~Simplified Morning Prayer

​3:00 PM Thursday~Bible Study

5:00 PM  Thursday~Simplified Evening Prayer





Perhaps you're a visitor on Long Beach Island. Maybe you haven't been in Church for a while and would like to start back. Whatever is going on in your life, you are welcome at Holy Innocents. Your past affiliations don't mean nearly as much to us as your present affiliation with us. 

New: Weekly Prayer Needs ​
(click here)

These needs are really little stories from the field relating some of the things the International Justice Mission is working on. As we start a new year, I’d like to point out some of the ways IJM works with local authorities to bring peace, love and safety to thousands of poor people who live with the threats of violence every day.

Some of the things they do are not “stand-up-and-take-notice” events. Much of the work is done behind the scenes, aiming at long-term change instead of mind-boggling rescues. In Uganda, IJM has, for years, worked with local police, training them in methods of dealing with victims so they are seen as protectors, not oppressors.

When there is a rescue, IJM stays on the job, working with local authorities to help the victims heal and to provide support to local courts so that survivors can live without the fear of further abuse. The process IJM has developed is one of using modern data collection methods to analyze patterns of violence to prevent it before it can occur.

And it’s not all tireless work. The story from Thailand tells of celebrating the success of securing legal rights for thousands of stateless people, giving them hope that they could only dream of before.


Click the link above to read more about these stories, and check back every week for more good news.